Jim Croce
Bad, Bad Leroy Brown
Original Translation of Slang

Well the South side of Chicago
Is the baddest part of town
And if you go down there
You better just beware
Of a man named Leroy Brown

Now Leroy more than trouble
You see he stand 'bout six foot four
All the downtown ladies call him Treetop Lover
All the men just call him 'Sir'

CHORUS


baddest most dangerous



he stand 'bout six foot four he is 6 feet 4 inches tall
Treetop Lover most likely because he's tall - 6' 4" is about 193 cm
'Sir' term of respect

And it's bad, bad Leroy Brown
The baddest man in the whole damned town
Badder than old King Kong
And meaner than a junkyard dog

Now Leroy he a gambler
And he like his fancy clothes
And he like to wave his diamond rings
In front of everybody's nose
He got a custom Continental
He got an Eldorado too
He got a 32 gun in his pocket for fun
He got a razor in his shoe

CHORUS

bad tough, dangerous
damned used for emphasis (impolite)
King Kong Giant ape who falls in love with a woman in the classic 1933 horror movie of the same name
junkyard dog dogs used to guard junkyards (places where old cars and parts, etc. are sold) are well known to be extremely vicious





Continental, Eldorado luxury cars

32 gun 32 caliber handgun (one with a .32 inch/8mm barrel)

Now Friday 'bout a week ago
Leroy shootin' dice
And at the edge of the bar
Sat a girl named Doris
And ooh! that girl looked nice
Well he cast his eyes upon her
And the trouble soon began
Cause Leroy Brown learned a lesson
Bout messin' with the wife of a jealous man

CHORUS

Well the two men took to fighting
And when they pulled them off the floor
Leroy looked like a jigsaw puzzle
With a couple of pieces gone


shootin' dice was throwing dice



cast his eyes upon her he looked at her (not slang - this is an old fashioned formal expression)


messin' with getting into trouble with

Leroy more than trouble = Leroy is more than trouble. Croce's use of non-standard grammar in this 1973 song contains features similar to what is typically called Ebonics or Black English Vernacular, though Croce himself was white. Other non-standard features include "he got" = he has got, "he like to wave" = he likes to wave, etc.

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